Carnivale Cushion: Crochet-Along Part 4

Carnival cushion crochet along mandala
Hi everyone
I’ve loved seeing all your finished cushion fronts so far! Now it’s time to make our cushion backs, so let’s get started.
Today’s special stitch will be the Front Post Double Crochet (FPdc).

This stitch gives a raised ridge effect and is a great stitch to use to add texture to your work and can also be used to make increases as we will be doing to complete our cushion backs.
The only difference between a FPdc and a standard dc is where you place your hook.
Here’s how:

Front Post Double Crochet (FPdc)

front post double crochet steps
1. Yarn over hook
2. Slide your hook under the post of the dc indicated in pattern
3. Yarn over hook
4. Pull up loop
5. Yarn over hook
6. Pull through 2 loops
7. Yarn over hook and pull through remaining 2 loops. FPdc stitch made.
crochet circles
Ok, now we’re ready to finish our cushion backs.
I’ve given instructions for changing colour after every 2 rows but you can change colours as you like and alter the pattern accordingly.

Another note, I won’t be using the standing dc method to start new colour rounds as I did for the cushion front. I find that they look too fat next to the FPdc and a little bit messy. But this is just my opinion and you can use whichever method you prefer.

Hooks at the ready. Here we go:

Round 1
• Using Colour A make a magic circle
• Ch 3 (counts as first dc throughout)
• 11 dc into ring
• Join with a sl st into top of first ch3 (12dc)

Round 2
• Still using Colour A, Ch 3, FPdc around dc directly below in previous row (will describe as ‘around dc below’ from here on)
• *dc in next st, FPdc around dc below
• Repeat from * to end.
• Join with sl into top of first ch 3. Break off yarn (24 dc)

Round 3
• Join Colour B and ch 3, dc in next st, FPdc around dc below
• *dc in next 2 sts, FPdc around dc below
• Repeat from * to end.
• Join with sl into top of first ch 3 (36 dc)

Round 4
• Still using Colour B ch 3, dc in next 2 dc, FPdc around dc below
• *dc in next 3 sts, FPdc around dc below
• Repeat from * to end.
• Join with sl into top of first ch 3. Break off yarn (48 dc)

Round 5
• Join Colour C and ch 3, dc in next 3 dc, FPdc around dc below
• *dc in next 4 sts, FPdc around dc below
• Repeat from * to end
• Join with sl into top of first ch 3 (60 dc)

Round 6
• Still using Colour C ch 3, dc in next 4 dc, FPdc around dc below
• *dc in next 5 sts, FPdc around dc below
• Repeat from * to end.
• Join with sl into top of first ch 3. Break off yarn (72 dc)

Round 7
• Join Colour D and ch 3, dc in next 5 dc, FPdc around dc below
• *dc in next 6 sts, FPdc around dc below
• Repeat from * to end.
• Join with sl into top of first ch 3 (84 dc)

Round 8
• Still using Colour D ch 3, dc in next 6 dc, FPdc around dc below
• *dc in next 7 sts, FPdc around dc below
• Repeat from * to end.
• Join with sl into top of first ch 3. Break off yarn (96 dc)

Round 9
• Join Colour A and ch 3, dc in next 7 dc, FPdc around dc below
• *dc in next 8 sts, FPdc around dc below
• Repeat from * to end.
• Join with sl into top of first ch 3 (108 dc)

Round 10
• Still using Colour A ch 3, dc in next 8 dc, FPdc around dc below
• *dc in next 9 sts, FPdc around dc below
• Repeat from * to end.
• Join with sl into top of first ch 3. Break off yarn (120 dc)

Round 11
• Join Colour B and ch 3, dc in next 9 dc, FPdc around dc below
• *dc in next 10 sts, FPdc around dc below
• Repeat from * to end.
• Join with sl into top of first ch 3 (132 dc)

Round 12
• Still using Colour B Ch 3, dc in next 10 dc, FPdc around dc below
• *dc in next 11 sts, FPdc around dc below
• Repeat from * to end.
• Join with sl into top of first ch 3. Break off yarn (144 dc)

Round 13
• Join Colour C and ch 3, dc in next 11 dc, FPdc around dc below
• *dc in next 12 sts, FPdc around dc below
• Repeat from * to end.
• Join with sl into top of first ch 3 (156 dc)

And just when you thought you’d memorised the pattern repeat, it changes slightly in this next, final round as we need to keep the stitch count the same as for the front. In this round we will only be increasing in every third section …

Round 14
• Still using Colour C Ch 3, dc in next 11 dc, FPdc around dc below
• *dc in next 12 sts, don’t make a dc into next stitch but do make a FPdc in the dc from the
previous row below it. Repeat from * once more
• dc in next 13 sts, FPdc around dc below **
• Repeat from * to ** to end but finish with 13dc.
• Join with sl into top of first FPdc. Break off yarn (160 dc)
• Weave in ends and we’re done!

Blocking

Are your finished cushion pieces cupping up a little like this?
How to block crochet
Don’t worry, we are about to perform magic! I can’t stress enough how much of a difference blocking really does make to your work. Even if you think it looks fine – blocking will make it even better, giving it a more professional and neat finish as well as a beautiful drape to your fabric.

Blocking helps to relax fibres, improves drape, straighten edges, smooth out stitches, open up lacy stitch work and give shape to garments. Think of it as a nice massage and spa treatment after a hard day of being twisted around a metal hook and pushed through a small hole.

Blocking works it’s magic best on natural fibres but the results will vary with acrylics. In the case of acrylics it will, at the very least, straighten out your work but it really does depend on each individual yarn how it will take to blocking.

For today though I would really like you to give it a try so you can see the difference for yourself.

There are several different blocking methods that all work well. My favourite is the Wet Block method which we’ll cover here.

You will need:

Rust proof pins
A tub of tepid water
A dash of wool wash *optional (I like my stuff to smell nice too)
A towel
Something to pin your work to. (I use a piece of foam board but you could use a folded towel, ironing board or any flat pinnable surface.)
Template or measuring tape

How to:

how to block crochet
1. Submerge your work in tepid water and leave alone to soak for 5-10 minutes. Don’t rub or wring or you’ll end up with felt!
Let the water out of the tub and gently press out excess water. Again, no vigorous squeezing or wringing.
2. Place your work onto a towel and roll up like a burrito to remove the rest of the excess water.
How to block crochet
3. Place onto your blocking board and smooth into shape. Use your template or measuring tape to make sure it’s even. My cushion measures 12 inches but yours may vary depending on your yarn choice.
4. Use pins at regular intervals to hold in place.
5. Leave to dry for about 24 hours (may need more depending on the weather)

Remove pins and admire the perfectly shaped, beautifully draped loveliness before you.
back_finished-600
Well that’s it for this week. Cintia will be doing a tutorial to make a round cushion insert in the next instalment then I’ll be back for the final where we will be joining our cushions and making crochet pom poms.

Don’t forget you can add your progress pictures to the Ravelry group or tag them with #carnivalecal on Instagram.

Part 1: Gather supplies
Part 2 : Cushion front – first half
Part 3: Cushion front – second half
Part 4: Cushion back and blocking
Part 5: Finishing off

See you soon Michelle x

Michelle poppy and Bliss About Michelle Robinson
Michelle is the face behind Poppy & Bliss. Her passion is crochet and her style is modern, vibrant and fun.
She teaches workshops in various styles of crochet, designs modern crochet patterns, occasionally remembers she has a blog at Poppy & Bliss but shares most of her work on Instagram